IG’s long stretch in limbo of administrative leave is unfair to him, agency and taxpayers (Article)

Debra Roth, Partner, Shaw Bransford & Roth P.C., a federal employment law firm, was quoted in The Federal Diary of The Washington Post, "IG’s long stretch in limbo of administrative leave is unfair to him, agency and taxpayers" in May 2014.

Getting paid almost $190,000 a year to skip work might sound great, but it’s not.

Ask Paul Brachfeld. He’s been on paid administrative leave from his position as the National Archives inspector general (IG) since Sept. 14, 2012. That’s more than 19 months, or about 600 days.

Too long.

“I don’t think anybody would like to live the life I’ve lived,” Brachfeld said.

He was put on leave by his boss, David S. Ferriero, the archivist of the United States.

The particulars of Brachfeld’s case aside, it raises important questions about the use of administrative leave by federal agencies and about the independence of those inspectors general who answer to the leaders of the agencies the IGs investigate.

Read the full article.

News source: The Washington Post